Tomorrow is Easter! How are you celebrating? I’ll be at church tonight (which is a tad weird to me, but our pastor asked us regular attenders to consider attending tonight so more visitors can attend tomorrow, so okay!), and will have brunch tomorrow with my family. Mmmmmmm pecan rolls, sausage, bacon, eggs … I love Easter food! (And of course a Cadbury cream egg in there somewhere.)

Easter’s arrival got me thinking about how it’s celebrated around the world. Read on for three unique Easter celebrations in Europe specifically.

 

Holy Week & Easter: Around The World

Spain

In Spanish, Holy Week translates as Semana Santa. Catholic brotherhoods or fraternities come together in just about every Spanish town nationwide during during this time. More conservative celebrations are observed in northern Spain, compared to the much more glamorous celebrations found in Andalusia. The two most common things to see across the board: floats and nazarenos, or penitential robes. Interestingly, nazareno could be literally translated as Nazarene — a common reference or title to Jesus.

A Semana Santa / Easter week processional in Leon, (northern) Spain. Image via TravelWithAllSenses.com.

A Semana Santa / Easter week processional in Leon, (northern) Spain. Image via TravelWithAllSenses.com.

 

Semana Santa in Sevilla, Spain. Image via TuAlbum.es.

Semana Santa in Sevilla, Spain. Image via TuAlbum.es.

 

Russia

Many Russian Orthodox Christians begin Holy Week with a major housecleaning. Spring cleaning a la Easter?
Baking begins on Palm Sunday and culminates on Easter. (I’d like a bite or two of that spread! Kulich, anyone?) Easter mass begins late Saturday night, culminating in a candlelight ceremony right around midnight. Celebrants used to (and may still) bring their lit candles out to the cemetery, bringing the good news of Christ’s resurrection to their departed loved ones. They often hung decorated eggs around crosses by the tombstones, as well.

Easter celebrations in Moscow, Russia. Image via AsiaNews.it.

Easter celebrations in Moscow, Russia. Image via AsiaNews.it.

Italy

One unique Florentian celebration is over 350 years old: the ‘explosion of the cart’, or Scoppio del Carro. A pair of oxen pulls a 17th-century wagon to the Duomo square. Fireworks are lit and the cart ‘explodes’! I’d sure like to see this someday.

Read more about what this entails at VisitFlorence.com, or check out the below video!

What Easter traditions or celebrations have you participated in? Tell me about your most memorable Easter!

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